Flowers

Flowers convey a special beauty that’s comforting, inspiring, and peaceful.

Here are some favorite photos that I show in my photo class and talk about garden photography.

Enjoy.


Bigelow Sneezeweed, in Photo Article: "See Photos of Flowers" by Steve Kaye

Bigelow Sneezeweed


Bigelow Sneezeweed received its name because it made people sneeze. I took this photo in Sequoia National Park.


Bigelow Sneezeweed, in Photo Article: "See Photos of Flowers" by Steve Kaye

Bigelow Sneezeweed


This is a young Bigelow Sneezeweed, working its way up to looking like the one in the first photo.


Cow Parsnip, in Photo Article: "See Photos of Flowers" by Steve Kaye

Cow Parsnip


You can take photos from above or below.


Daffodil, in Photo Article: "See Photos of Flowers" by Steve Kaye

Daffodil


This beautiful flower often pushes its way though snow to appear in early spring.


Dark Purple Aeoniums, in Photo Article: "See Photos of Flowers" by Steve Kaye

Dark Purple Aeoniums


Notice how the dark leaves provide a rich background for the yellow blossoms.


Desert Gold, in Photo Article: "See Photos of Flowers" by Steve Kaye

Desert Gold


I took this photo on the way up to The Artist’s Palette in Death Valley National Park.


Echinocereus Pentalophus, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Echinocereus Pentalophus


Cactus flowers offer an extraordinary spectrum of color and complexity.


Myosotis, Forget-Me-Not, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Myosotis, Forget-Me-Not


The Forget-Me-Not is small, measuring about half an inch (1.2 cm).


Gymnocalycium bayrianum, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Gymnocalycium bayrianum


It’s incredible that a plant as hostile as a cactus could produce such beautiful flowers.


Magnolia, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Magnolia


The inside of this Magnolia blossom looks like a small tree.


Mustang Clover, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Mustang Clover


During early summer this small flower blankets large areas in Sequoia National Park.


Phacelia, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Phacelia


I took this photo in Death Valley National Park in early January.


Pilosocereus Palmeri, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Pilosocereus Palmeri


This flower opens at night and closes by mid day. It’s pollinated by (mostly) bats and moths.


Pincushion Flower, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Pincushion Flower


Notice the world of complexity in this flower.


Pink Knotweed (Polygonum Capitatum), (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Pink Knotweed (Polygonum Capitatum)


This is actually a cluster of tiny flowers. The image that you see is less than half an inch wide (about 1-cm).


Shaving Brush Tree, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Shaving Brush Tree


These flowers bloom in the early summer.


Snow Plant, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Snow Plant


The Snow Plant is actually a saprophyte lacking chlorophyll that derives its nutrients from fungi that attach to the roots of trees. They bloom in April to July. I took this photo in Sequoia National Park.


Stapelia flavopurpurea, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye

Stapelia flavopurpurea


I bought this flower at a farmer’s market so that I could take photos of it.


See more photos at: Bird Photos and Other Photos