Meet the House Finch


House Finch, Male, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, in Meet the House Finch

House Finch, Male


The House Finch is a common bird, found in parks and yards all over North America.

They were originally native to the Southwest, living near streams, woodland edges, or chaparral.

In 1940 New York pet store owners, who were selling the birds illegally, released the birds to avoid prosecution. This adaptive bird survived and developed a population that spread westward, eventually meeting its kin in the West.

Now it has become so common that many people dismiss it as just another brown bird.

However, if you ask them, they will tell you that they are a very important bird. Since they frequent bird feeders, they have helped keep many pet store owners in business. And their song entertains people nationwide.

They’re almost 100% vegetarian, eating seeds, buds, berries, fruits, and leaves. Occasionally, they’ll catch a bug to provide protein for a nestling.

Welcome to this photo celebration.


The female is a plain brown bird.

She can compensate for this by posing against colorful backgrounds.


House Finch, Female, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, in Meet the House Finch

House Finch, Female


The male can appear with colors ranging from pale orange to bright red.


House Finch, Male, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, in Meet the House Finch

Pale Orange


House Finch, Male, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, in Meet the House Finch

Rich Orange


House Finch, Male, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, in Meet the House Finch

Red


Juveniles have a remnant of downy feathers.

And if you look carefully, you’ll see a bit of orange/yellow in the corner of their bill. This is most easily seen when examining enlarged versions of photos.


House Finch, Juvenile, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, in Meet the House Finch

House Finch, Juvenile


See more photos of this bird at:

The Joy of Photographing Details

The House Finch Project

Caution


Did You Know?

The most effective way to help birds is to buy land.

Here are three organizations that excel at doing this.

1) American Bird Conservancy

2) The Nature Conservancy

3) The Trust for Public Land

Please visit their web sites to learn about the work they do.

Here’s an excellent book: The American Bird Conservancy Guide to Bird Conservation


You can help – Please share this blog with others.
Inspiring Respect for Nature, one bird at a time.

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