Anna’s Hummingbird, Male, © Photo by Steve Kaye

The Bird with a Million Faces


Meet the Bird with a Million Faces


Anna’s Hummingbird, Male, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: The Bird with a Million Faces

Anna’s Hummingbird, Male


Few people realize the male Anna’s Hummingbird has a million faces.

(Give or take a few.)

Usually, they see something like the bird in the above photo.

But the male’s gorget can show a rainbow of hues, going from black to red to pink to gold.

For example, it can go from looking like this:


Anna’s Hummingbird, Male, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: The Bird with a Million Faces

Anna’s Hummingbird, Male


to looking like this:


Anna’s Hummingbird, Male, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: The Bird with a Million Faces

Anna’s Hummingbird, Male


Or it can go from looking like this:


Anna’s Hummingbird, Male, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: The Bird with a Million Faces

Anna’s Hummingbird, Male


to looking like this:


Anna’s Hummingbird, Male, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: The Bird with a Million Faces

Anna’s Hummingbird, Male


And this is just a small sample of what this bird can show.

So the next time that you’re out, pause a moment to watch this bird display its million faces.

Wish you the best,

Steve Kaye

PS: See more photos of hummingbirds here: Hummingbird Photos


Hummingbird Info

Hummingbirds are able to move the feathers in their gorget, thereby changing the angle they make with the sun. Then this increases or decreases their luminescence.

Since hummingbirds eat about twice their body weight in nectar each day, protecting their habitat is critical.

So when this bird sees another hummingbird, it flashes its gorget as a warning. If the intruder ignores this warning, the bird will chase the other bird by flying toward it. And that ends the dispute, until intruder returns.


Help Hummingbirds

About 10% of the 338 species of hummingbirds in the World are threatened.

If you’d like to help, please support organizations that work to protect birds.

In this case, I recommend joining: The Hummingbird Society

This wonderful organization helps hummingbirds in many ways, including conservation programs, educational resources, and their annual Sedona Hummingbird Festival (July 28-30, 2017).


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4 Comments
  • Susan Bulger
    Posted at 07:24h, 29 March

    Once again your patience is rewarded.

  • Beth Kingsley Hawkins
    Posted at 09:17h, 29 March

    Love it! Thanks for showing the Anna’s colorful transformational possibilities! Beth

  • Kathryn Grace
    Posted at 09:20h, 29 March

    Hummingbirds never fail to bring a smile to my face. I listen for the flick of their wings when I’m out and about, and stop in my tracks in hopes of spying the fast-darting mites. Your photos always captivate me, Steve. And I so appreciate your reminders and tips for caring for our feathered friends.

  • Bob Franz
    Posted at 07:29h, 03 April

    I wish some one would change “gorget” to something more pleasant sounding or descriptive – how about “palette”?

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