Anna’s Hummingbird, Female, © Photo by Steve Kaye

Signs of Spring


Three Signs of Spring


Anna’s Hummingbird, Female, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: Signs of Spring

Anna’s Hummingbird, Female


Many indications tell that spring is near:

From groundhogs seeing their shadow, to sunsets happening at later times, to outside temperatures becoming warmer.

And then there’s another indication: Hummingbirds.

The first photo shows an Anna’s Hummingbird with spider web silk on her bill. That tells us she’s building a nest.

The Anna’s Hummingbird builds its nest out of plant down held together with spider web silk. Then she lines the nest with feathers or other soft materials.

Her nest begins just large enough to hold two eggs. Then, thanks to the spider web silk, the nest stretches as the nestlings grow.


Anna’s Hummingbird, Female, © Photo by Steve Kaye, in blog post: Signs of Spring

Anna’s Hummingbird, Female


The next photo shows a pregnant hummingbird (that is, one with eggs).

Hummingbirds typically lay two eggs each season. So she looks ready in this photo.


Anna’s Hummingbird Adult Female and Juvenile, (c) Photo by Steve Kaye, , in blog post: Signs of Spring

Anna’s Hummingbird, Adult Female and Juvenile


Once the eggs hatch, the female works hard to find enough food to feed her nestlings plus herself.

Typically, a hummingbird consumes twice its body weight in nectar each day. Now she must find more.

The above photo shows a female feeding a newly fledged juvenile.

And the remarkable part of this that these birds start anew every spring, regardless of the winter before.

Much success,

Steve Kaye

PS: See more photos of hummingbirds at: Hummingbird Photos


Help Birds Tip

If you find a nest, please leave it alone.

When frightened, birds provide less food to their nestlings and sometimes they will abandon a nest.

So watch from a far distance. Then we can look forward to having more birds next year.


Birding Resources

Want to know more about hummingbirds? See: The Hummingbird Society

This wonderful organization works to protect hummingbirds in many ways, including conservation programs, educational resources, and their annual Sedona Hummingbird Festival.


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5 Comments
  • Kathryn Grace
    Posted at 04:39h, 16 February

    What a masterful photographer you are Steve, to capture hummingbirds with such clarity. As always, I am thrilled with your images. I miss getting to see hummingbirds flitting about outside my bedroom window. City life, at least in this neighborhood, is not the best for hummingbirds, but we do get a flock of parrots overhead twice a day.

  • Daphne Radenhurst
    Posted at 09:07h, 16 February

    Very informative and interesting and beautiful photos of the humming birds.

  • Cody Sontag
    Posted at 20:07h, 16 February

    Beautiful Steve. We have had some spring-like days here in Stuttgart. I think that will pass, but it has been a lovely view into what will soon be Spring. Your images inspire.

  • Tony Gonzalez
    Posted at 21:22h, 16 February

    Awesome Photos. Will be there after the rains go away . . . Tony

  • Bob Franz
    Posted at 06:42h, 17 February

    Looks like Hummers are quite suited for building their nest – they are equipped with a needle to use weaving the thread spider-web silk)..

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